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  • Texas A&M Expert: Polar Vortex Has Cold Air, But What Does It Really Mean?

    Texas A&M Expert: Polar Vortex Has Cold Air, But What Does It Really Mean?

    Dec 6, 2016

    With a major cold air mass expected to cover most of the U.S. this week – as much as 75 percent of the country could experience temperatures below freezing — it’s the time of year when the term “polar vortex” creeps into the news.  But it might be a good time to set the record straight on what exactly a polar vortex is, says a Texas A&M University weather expert.

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  • October Goes Down As 4th Warmest Ever, Says Texas A&M State Climatologist

    October Goes Down As 4th Warmest Ever, Says Texas A&M State Climatologist

    Nov 2, 2016

    Warm temperatures in Texas dominated the month of October, so much so that the month will go down as the fourth warmest October in the state’s history, according to figures from the State Climatologist at Texas A&M University.

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  • Texas Experiences Wettest August In 100 Years

    Texas Experiences Wettest August In 100 Years

    Aug 31, 2016

    If you think August was a wet month in Texas, pick up your prize.  Preliminary totals indicate that August averaged about 5.69 inches of rain statewide, in a tie with 1914 for the wettest August on record, according to figures from the State Climatologist office at Texas A&M University.

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  • As El Niño Fades, Expect Warmer And Drier Weather

    As El Niño Fades, Expect Warmer And Drier Weather

    May 6, 2016

    The current El Niño that has lasted since summer of 2015 is on its way out and after one of the warmest winters on record in Texas, that could change weather patterns in the next few months, says Texas A&M University professor and State Climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon.

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  • Wild Weather Patterns For Texas

    Wild Weather Patterns For Texas

    Feb 26, 2016

    Texas has experienced extreme weather over the past five years – from historic droughts to the wettest month in the state’s history — and it’s difficult to say if the pattern will dramatically change over the next few years, says a Texas A&M professor who also serves as the State Climatologist.

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